Burned

Burned (Fever #7) by Karen Marie Moning
Published by Dell on November 24th 2015
Genres: urban fantasy
Pages: 465
Goodreads

It’s easy to walk away from lies. Power is another thing.

MacKayla Lane would do anything to save the home she loves. A gifted sidhe-seer, she’s already fought and defeated the deadly Sinsar Dubh—an ancient book of terrible evil—yet its hold on her has never been stronger.

When the wall that protected humans from the seductive, insatiable Fae was destroyed on Halloween, long-imprisoned immortals ravaged the planet. Now Dublin is a war zone with factions battling for control. As the city heats up and the ice left by the Hoar Frost King melts, tempers flare, passions run red-hot, and dangerous lines get crossed.

Seelie and Unseelie vie for power against nine ancient immortals who have governed Dublin for millennia; a rival band of sidhe-seers invades the city, determined to claim it for their own; Mac’s former protégé and best friend, Dani “Mega” O’Malley, is now her fierce enemy; and even more urgent, Highland druid Christian MacKeltar has been captured by the Crimson Hag and is being driven deeper into Unseelie madness with each passing day. The only one Mac can depend on is the powerful, dangerous immortal Jericho Barrons, but even their fiery bond is tested by betrayal.

It’s a world where staying alive is a constant struggle, the line between good and evil gets blurred, and every alliance comes at a price. In an epic battle against dark forces, Mac must decide who she can trust, and what her survival is ultimately worth.

Burned is book #7 in the Fever series. It’s taken me a bit, but I’m slowly making my way towards the end. I’m happy and sad for this series to end.

Happy because I’d like to find out how it all ends. Also happy because I can move on to some of my other books taking up precious space on my shelves.

Sad because I’ve been in this world so long and I’ll be sad to see it go.

Burned was a decent filler book. And by filler, I don’t mean a lot isn’t happening. There is. It’s just that I know it’s all a build up for the books that are to come. And that’s okay. Some books are meant to be middle books. It was still very entertaining, especially since there was a little more…levity to this one than the most recent (Iced was humorous because of Dani, but still felt dark). I mean, Mac accidentally goes invisible and uses this time to spy on those around her. How could that not be funny.

All in all, a decent book. It’s made me excited for Feverborn.

Now there will be spoilers ahead.

Spoilers I tell you.

Spoilers.

At the end of Iced, Mac chased Dani into the silvers. When Dani comes back out to Dublin, it’s been five odd years for her, whereas it’s been a couple of weeks in human land. Although you don’t know this in the beginning. Dani is lost, Mac can’t go after her, everyone’s looking for her, and then there’s this new badass in town named Jada. You know where I’m going with this. We find out that Jada is Dani, and I wasn’t sure how to feel about it. Because I know that there was an uproar over Dani being so young and lusted after in Iced, I feel like this was an easy way to grow Dani up fast, but it still felt really weird. I still have a huge issue with the whole Dani/Mac fight thing, so that also might be colouring my view of the scenario a little. I technically understand the backstory on why Dani turns into Jada, I just wish it could have been done a little better.

The only other issue I have here is with the scene that is used as a foreword for the book. It’s the scene where Jericho first visited Mac in the room she was staying in when she first came to Dublin. In the original scene we read in Darkfever, they argue a bit and then he leaves. In this “real” scene, we find out that Mac and Jericho actually had hot steamy sex, but Mac wasn’t ready for it so Jericho suppressed the memory so she wouldn’t hate him. There’s this entire build up to her finding out that he did this at the beginning of the book, then she finds out at the worst possible moment, is obviously pissed, then when he explains his reasoning, she basically just accepts it. Like, okay fine, you understand why he did what he did. But the build up to this was completely unnecessary if it was just going to be accepted. Was it to show how strong she’s gotten? How their relationship has changed? Both of those points have been proven through other means in the books.

Anyway, spoilers over. That’s all I have to say about Burned!

One StarOne StarOne Star

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